Boston’s Immigrant Experience in 1900 – Anticipation & Hope Amidst Confusion & Exploitation

Imagine the anticipation of these folks aboard the SS Canopic as it docked in Boston over 90 years ago.  Were your grandparents or great-grandparents among these immigrants, who had perhaps spent more than a week aboard ship traveling to a new life?  How long had these families planned, sacrificed, and prepared for this moment as…Read more Boston’s Immigrant Experience in 1900 – Anticipation & Hope Amidst Confusion & Exploitation

1918: Spanish Influenza invades Massachusetts

As summer became autumn in 1918, the Spanish Flu struck hard at the eastern shores of New England.  Cases emerged in Boston, Brockton, Quincy, and Gloucester and at Camp Devens.  By mid-September, 21 flu-related deaths were reported in Boston alone.  By October 1, 85,000 cases had been reported statewide and the city was experiencing deaths…Read more 1918: Spanish Influenza invades Massachusetts

If you were to walk . . . Boston’s Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market, 1886

If you were to walk . . . Boston's Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market 125 years ago, on the afternoon before Thanksgiving, you would encounter a large assortment of the city's vegetable and meat merchants, selling their wares from the many wagons crowding the scene.  Today, although these merchants have long since moved on to…Read more If you were to walk . . . Boston’s Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market, 1886

Turkey Drovers – Traditions from Thanksgiving Days Past

It turns out that wild turkeys are incredibly difficult to move across long distances.  In the days before refrigerated travel, a national roadway system, and even railroads, driving turkeys across long stretches of land was the province of men called turkey drovers.  From 1790 to about 1830, turkey drovers walked turkeys to market, literally, at a…Read more Turkey Drovers – Traditions from Thanksgiving Days Past

In His Words: Charles Dickens’ Perspective on New England and Public Transport, 1842

We New Englanders have long called Boston "the Hub".  And there's a sense, just barely concealed, that we're really referring to the hub of the universe, and not merely the hub of the state or region.   Undoubtedly, New England has a strong regional identity that includes the ubiquitous image of the "proper Bostonian" as well as a…Read more In His Words: Charles Dickens’ Perspective on New England and Public Transport, 1842

The Civility of the Past – Our Ancestors’ Experiences with Public Transport

Do you commute to work using public transportation?  There's a certain etiquette, a set of norms, that is easily observable when you are on the bus, the train, the subway, or even a plane.  There's a prevailing thought out there that civility is a "thing of the past".  But, was it?  Did our ancestors live…Read more The Civility of the Past – Our Ancestors’ Experiences with Public Transport

If you were to walk . . . Boston’s Scollay Square and Tremont Street, 1895

If you were to walk . . . through Boston's Scollay Square and down Tremont Street, into what those alive in 1895 called "the congested district", you would feel the crush of people and electric car traffic on what, even then, was considered a narrow road.  On this midsummer workday, as you walk southwest through the…Read more If you were to walk . . . Boston’s Scollay Square and Tremont Street, 1895