The Story of Lowell’s Shedd Park

The gates are familiar to all who pass Lowell's Shedd Park at the intersection of Rogers Street (Route 38) and Knapp Avenue in the city's Belvidere section.  And they tell a story of some of the greatest generosity ever experienced by the city of Lowell. Today, Lowell's Shedd Park is home to fifty acres of…Read more The Story of Lowell’s Shedd Park

Cornhill – Once Boston’s Literary Center, Today Replaced by Government Center

It wasn't Cornhill Street, Cornhill Road, Cornhill Avenue, or even the Cornhill; instead, it was just Cornhill, and in its day, knowing this was just one more way that those in the know had to distinguish locals from those visiting Boston as tourists. In its history, Boston has had two roads called Cornhill.  The first,…Read more Cornhill – Once Boston’s Literary Center, Today Replaced by Government Center

What was before – What once occupied the site of today’s Pru?

Seen from any approach to Boston, the Prudential Tower has figured prominently into Boston's skyline since its construction in the early 1960's.  And, with 52 floors, the Pru stands as Boston's second-tallest building, just behind the John Hancock Tower's sixty.  The Tower, completed in 1964, rises 749 feet, or, with its radio mast (pictured atop…Read more What was before – What once occupied the site of today’s Pru?

The Great White Hurricane – New England’s Blizzard of 1888

During New England's Blizzard of 1888, also known as the Great White Hurricane, over four feet of snow fell in Connecticut and Massachusetts.  The storm dumped as much as 40 inches of snow in New York and New Jersey.  In a world before road salt and snowblowers, the Great White Hurricane suspended communication and travel…Read more The Great White Hurricane – New England’s Blizzard of 1888

If you were to walk . . . Boston’s North Union Station, 1895

Any discussion on "Lost Boston" has to include Boston's North Union Station, which once stood on Causeway Street, on the current site of the TD Garden (better known locally as "the Boston Garden" and by some as the "Fleet Center").  North Union Station, which consolidated the operations of four different railroads into one building, was…Read more If you were to walk . . . Boston’s North Union Station, 1895

The Ebbing Excitement Surrounding the Opening of Boston’s Tremont Street Subway, 1897

Have you visited Boston?  Do you have ancestors who lived or visited here?  Since you're reading a blog called Forgotten New England, chances are good that you, or someone on a branch of your family tree, has ridden Boston's subway.  Boston's subway, or 'the T' as its locally known, makes a very walkable city even…Read more The Ebbing Excitement Surrounding the Opening of Boston’s Tremont Street Subway, 1897

Worries of the Past: Smallpox and Boston’s Epidemic of 1872

First, flu-like symptoms emerge -fever, aches, pains, nausea.  Exhaustion soon follows.  It's not until a few days later when the telltale, flat, red spots appear about the face, hands, and arms.  The spots evolve into pus-filled blisters that scab first and then fall off, to reveal deep, pitted scars.  Smallpox was one of history's most…Read more Worries of the Past: Smallpox and Boston’s Epidemic of 1872