If Ancestors Could Talk: The Words of Nineteenth-Century New England

Eastern Massachusetts has its own way of saying things. Whether you're drinking a tonic, or slurping a frappe, or quenching your thirst with water from a bubbler, you know you're near Boston when the letter "r" starts migrating within sentences (think 'supah idear').  To linguists, New England breaks into two dialect regions:  Eastern New England…Read more If Ancestors Could Talk: The Words of Nineteenth-Century New England

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Dating Old Photographs – The Clues that Tintypes Hold, 1890

Most family historians have THAT box.  The box always looks roughly the same.  It's the box that belonged to the toaster your mother had three toasters ago.  Or, maybe it's a shoebox for a pair of long-lost boat shoes from Thom McAn or a gift box from Anderson Little (remember them?).  Maybe it's a bag…Read more Dating Old Photographs – The Clues that Tintypes Hold, 1890

Understanding Crime in Edwardian-Era Massachusetts – Arrests in Lowell, 1904

So, say you're writing a scene about Edwardian-era police officers in New England, or researching the life and times of a police officer ancestor.  Or, perhaps you're trying to get an idea of how people got into trouble with the law in the first years of the twentieth century.  You'll need to know why Edwardian-era…Read more Understanding Crime in Edwardian-Era Massachusetts – Arrests in Lowell, 1904

Unexpected Family Tree Finds – Western Electric’s Merrimack Valley Works

Sometimes, you need to work really hard to land the latest find in your family tree discoveries.  Sometimes, family history finds just fall in your lap.  Before going to work yesterday morning, I stopped at the barber shop, and checked Facebook while waiting for my turn in the chair.  And I found - quite a…Read more Unexpected Family Tree Finds – Western Electric’s Merrimack Valley Works

Most Likely to . . . Visit a Local History Center? High School Yearbooks and their Value to Genealogists

In these days of point-and-click genealogy (think sites like Ancestry.com or familysearch.org), local and regional history centers of the brick-and-mortar variety are sometimes unjustly overlooked.  Some, like the New England  Historic Genealogical Society, have online resources and an impressive web presence themselves.  Others, especially those dedicated to smaller cities or even towns, have wonderful resources…Read more Most Likely to . . . Visit a Local History Center? High School Yearbooks and their Value to Genealogists

Embrace your black sheep ancestors!

Black sheep ancestors - we've all got them.  If you don't, it probably means that you haven't discovered them yet.  I find them fascinating.  I mean, I enjoy the church-going, god-fearing, alms-giving ancestors as much as the next genealogist, but there's a certain spark of interest that surges when you come across ancestors who were…Read more Embrace your black sheep ancestors!

Boston’s Immigrant Experience in 1900 – Anticipation & Hope Amidst Confusion & Exploitation

Imagine the anticipation of these folks aboard the SS Canopic as it docked in Boston over 90 years ago.  Were your grandparents or great-grandparents among these immigrants, who had perhaps spent more than a week aboard ship traveling to a new life?  How long had these families planned, sacrificed, and prepared for this moment as…Read more Boston’s Immigrant Experience in 1900 – Anticipation & Hope Amidst Confusion & Exploitation